jakesheadwarning:

"There’s things you just can’t fight. Acts of God or whatever. Like you see a hurricane coming, you just have to get out of the way, you know? But when you’re in a Jaeger, suddenly you can draw a line in the sand. You can fight the hurricane — and you can win.”

drinkball:

lol let’s pretend i’m an ace photographer for a second okay

drinkball:

lol let’s pretend i’m an ace photographer for a second okay

A successful revolution must be medicine

To the benefit of the body in question.

bombthemusicindustry:

What a motherfucking bummer. 

bombthemusicindustry:

What a motherfucking bummer. 

joethewolfe:

This band is actually really inspiring

joethewolfe:

This band is actually really inspiring

jeffrosenstock:

transparent jeff rosenstock for all your punk rock blogging needs

jeffrosenstock:

transparent jeff rosenstock for all your punk rock blogging needs

fuckandfit:

There is something about waking up before the sun even rises that makes me just want to rip out my own eyes.

(Source: nikolemariastark)

Researchers claim the best way to stopping the phenomenon, sometimes known as earworms – where snippets of a catchy song inexplicably play like a broken record in your brain – is to solve some tricky anagrams.

This can force the intrusive music out of your working memory, they say, allowing it to be replaced with other more amenable thoughts.

But they also warn not to try anything too difficult as those irritating melodies may wiggle their way back into your consciousness.

For those unwilling to carry around a book of anagrams, a good novel may also do the trick.

literaryjukebox:

It is almost banal to say so yet it needs to be stressed continually: all is creation, all is change, all is flux, all is metamorphosis.

Henry Miller in Of Art and the Future

Song: “Come to Terms” by Torres

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